Changing Careers? Know Your Options

retirement

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What to do with your retirement funds when you change jobs or go into business full-time

There are many new challenges to face if you happen to be changing jobs or retiring – not the least of which is the decision of what to do with the retirement funds that have accumulated in your 401(k) and other retirement plans over the years of service with your employers. These decisions may have a significant impact on your future financial security in retirement.

Option 1) Your employer hands you a check for the amount in your retirement plan.
This may look like a bonanza, but selecting this option could be a mistake. First, your employer is required to withhold 20% from your lump sum distribution, so you will only receive 80%. Second, if you are younger than 59 1/2, you may be subject to a 10% additional federal income tax penalty for early withdrawal. Third, you are liable for paying income taxes on the full amount—if you fail to rollover the full amount of your funds, including the 20% that was withheld, into an IRA within 60 days.

Option 2) Leave the money with your old employer.
If you have more than $5000 in your former employer’s retirement plan, you can usually leave the money where it is. (Check with your employer.) The advantage of doing this is that it relieves you of making a decision for the time being while maintaining the tax deferral of your assets. The downside is that you are limited to the investment choices offered by your ex-employer—or even fewer choices, since some companies have additional restrictions for non-active employees. Additional disadvantages are that you cannot make new contributions to your account.

Option 3) Move your retirement money to your new employer.
This option only works if you are moving to another job. Even then, your new employer may not accept rollovers from a previous plan or may impose a waiting period. Also, the investment options offered by your new employer may not be as extensive as you want. The benefit is that you maintain your assets’ tax deferral and benefit from the convenience of having your assets in one place.

Option 4) Put the money into a traditional IRA Rollover.
By having your former employer’s retirement plan pay the IRA custodian directly, you avoid the 20% withholding or any penalties. There are numerous benefits to your own IRA Rollover: A potentially wider choice of investment opportunities—you can select the stocks, bonds, mutual funds or other investments that are right for you.

The ability to withdraw without penalty for some purposes. Withdrawals can be made without penalty by taking a series of substantially equal periodic payments for at least five years or until after you reach age 59 1/2. Withdrawals are subject to normal income tax treatment and may be subject to an additional 10% federal income tax penalty.  Thus, if you are planning to retire before you reach age 59 1/2, this method can enable you to dip into your IRA Rollover without penalty. Please note, there may be other eligible retirement plans which can accept funds.

Please be advised that this document is not intended as legal or tax advice. Accordingly, any tax information provided in this document is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by any taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer. The tax information was written to support the promotion or the marketing of the transaction(s) or matter(s) addressed and you should seek advice based on your particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor. AXA Advisors, LLC and AXA Network, LLC do not provide tax advice or legal advice. This article is provided by Antan Wilson. Antan Wilson offers securities through AXA Advisors, LLC (member FINRA, SIPC), 780 JOHNSON FERRY ROAD SUITE 600 ATLANTA, GA 30342 and offers investment advisory products and services through AXA Advisors, LLC, an investment advisor registered with the SEC, and offers annuity and insurance products through an insurance brokerage affiliate, AXA Network, LLC and its subsidiaries. This individual is licensed to transact insurance business in the following states: GA, DC, NJ, LA, NC; and is registered to offer securities in the following states: GA, NJ.

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Source: https://www.ameriprise.com/research-market-insights/financial-articles/retirement/what-to-do-with-your-401k-plan-when-you-change-jobs/

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Antan R. Wilson
780 Johnson Ferry Road
Suite 600
Atlanta, GA 30342
Tel: (404) 760-2418

28 Types of Content Upgrades You Can Easily Create

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1. A cheat sheet
Depending on what your blog post is about, a cheat sheet can be a simple content upgrade. For example, if I write a blog post explaining the different tags in HTML, I can create a one-pager of all the available HTML tags and how they’re used.

2. Checklist
A long, 4,000-word blog post can likely be converted into an easier-to-digest checklist. It can be an itemized step-by-step for a how-to blog post, a list of materials for a do-it-yourself project, or a list of best practices.

For example, if you’re sharing a process you have for promoting a blog post, you can create a checklist of everything the reader should do to promote the blog post.

Tools to easily create checklists: ForgettSweetProcess, and Checkli

3. List of resources
Do you mention a bunch tools or resources in your blog post? Create a master list linking to each of them for readers so they don’t have to search for each tool on their own. Then make that list available as a PDF download.

4. Transcripts for your podcast or video show
If you host interviews, have a podcast, or have a video show, transcribe your recording and make it into a downloadable PDF file. It takes less than 10 minutes of work for you to hire a transcriber and host the file.

Transcription services: Rev and Fiverr.

5. Video or audio recording
If you’ve previously hosted and recorded an interview, a webinar, or any informational video that’s relevant to the blog post, you can make the recording available as a bonus. You can create a how-to video of a blog post or record yourself reading your blog post out loud. It might sound like a strange idea, but some readers digest information differently.

Tool for audio editing: Audacity Tool for video editing: Camtasia

6. Quick start guide
You might be teaching something complicated. Simplify it. People want to get started quickly without worrying about the difficulties later on (those difficulties often prevent them from taking the first steps). Take the first three steps and simplify them to help the reader get over the initial barrier.

7. Full guide
Instead of a simple quick start guide, create a comprehensive guide that walks the reader step-by-step through the entire process. While it may be lengthier, it’ll target readers who are looking for in-depth guidance.

8. Report / whitepaper
Have you hosted a survey or done extensive research into a topic? Make it into a report that’ll educate readers about their industry or interest. Reports and whitepapers will also help you become recognized as an expert in your area of interest.

9. Printable
This could be a relevant diagram, motivational quote, or images the reader can print out and pin up on their wall. It’s a great reminder for readers to stay organized or focused.

10. Assignments or worksheets
If you’re teaching something, go beyond explaining the concept. Create homework assignments that your readers can download and immediately apply the knowledge.

For the rest of the article and to learn more visit Sumome.com

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28 Ideas for Content Upgrades To Grow Your Email List. How to make them, where to use them, providing the upgrade, and more

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You’ve written blog posts and you’ve gotten some traffic, and even though you have beautiful visitor numbers, your email list is another story.

You know that building an email list is important and you’ve started doing that, but your conversion rate is stagnant at around 1% … 2% on a great day.

What if you can get 10% of your website visitors to subscribe via email? How about 20%?

Sound too good to be true? It’s not. In fact it has already been done by other bloggers. It’s a proven method that’s possible for you to do too.

All it takes is creating tactical content upgrades to give visitors irresistible value. We’re going to give you the tools and knowledge to do just that.

In this guide, we’re going to cover:

  1. What are content upgrades
  2. Why you should create them (people have seen conversion rates improve by over 300%)
  3. 28 different types of content upgrades
  4. The simple 5-step framework to get started with content upgrades
  5. 4 questions to help you come up with irresistible content upgrades
  6. How to easily host your content upgrade in under 5 minutes
  7. 9 tips to make your content upgrades into list building machines

What Are Content Upgrades
A content upgrade is bonus piece of information that elaborates on or complements a piece of content the reader is already interested in. The bonus is both highly valuable and in context with the page’s content so we gate the bonus by asking for an email address, a Facebook share, a tweet, or an email to a friend.

In other words, a content upgrade is a valuable offer created to get a visitor’s email address or get them to promote you.

For example, if you were reading about how to fix a broken toilet, reading might not be enough. You might be interested in watching a bonus video that shows you how to fix your toilet because you can follow along with the video.

Boom. It’s a perfect content upgrade because the video showing you how to fix a toilet is both valuable and specific to the article you’re reading.

Why Content Upgrades
Successful content upgrades have helped people grow their email list exponentially.

If you’re unsure whether content upgrades will work for you, look below at the results from Backlinko by Brian Dean, an internationally-recognized entrepreneur and SEO expert.

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Yep. That’s a 785% improvement. Not too shabby.

But Brian isn’t the only one who has seen lucrative results from implementing content upgrades.

Devesh Khanal increased one blog post’s conversion rate for Growth Everywhere by 492% by implementing a content upgrade. Imagine doing that for ten blog posts.

Conversion rates are high for content upgrades because they provide an immediate reward instead of presenting a generic “subscribe for free updates” call-to-action. The reader is primed to give you their email for something useful and relevant to what they’re already invested in reading about in that exact moment in time.

It can be difficult to set up content upgrades. Keyword is can. However, using tools like Welcome MatList Builder, or Scroll Box, you can be set up in less than five minutes.

When it comes down to it, the time it takes to create a content upgrade should be thought of as an investment. As you saw above, the effects of implementing even one content upgrade can be exponential.

In fact, depending on what type of content upgrade you want to create, the whole process of ideation, creation, and implementation can take less than 30 minutes.

Before I tell you how to quickly create a content upgrade, here are 28 different types of content upgrades you can create.

Blog Received by Sumo.com for this and other great articles visit them here.

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Sales Pages, Landing Pages, and Squeeze Pages, Oh My!

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Sales pages and Landing pages are web pages with no navigation menu, no sidebar, no footer widget area, and no links off the page — except to a shopping cart or order form. Squeeze pages also have no navigation menu, no sidebar, no footer widget area, and no links off the page.

The premise behind these pages is to eliminate all distractions from the page, and keep visitors completely focused on taking one single action — they are used solely to increase conversions.

Sales Pages
Sales pages are pages with one single call to action — to get visitors to buy something and to make a sale. They are typically used for products, programs, services, and events. (For examples click here)

Landing Pages
Landing pages are pages on your website consumers “land on” when they follow or click a link from your marketing materials, advertising, or business promotions. Many people also create custom landing pages for social media profile URLs too. (For examples click here)

Squeeze Pages
Squeeze pages are pages that are designed to squeeze information out of visitors before they leave the page — usually they squeeze your email out of you through an opt-in. They are usually very short, simple, and direct. (For examples click here)

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ABOUT JENNIFER BOURN

CREATIVE DIRECTOR · DIGITAL STRATEGIST · WORDPRESS EVANGELIST

Probably a Sith… her passion brings forth intuitive design solutions. As founder of Bourn Creative, Jennifer is an award-winning designer who has been working in the design trenches since 1997. Today she consults on branding, website strategy, and digital strategy, leads all of our graphic design and web design projects, and specializes in WordPress theme design.

jennifer-bourn

When not obsessing over pixels, margins, and type, Jennifer manages the Bourn Creative brand and the creation and iteration of our internal systems and processes. She speaks often on podcasts, summits, and live events, and writes for our blog, WP Elevation, CoSchedule, and the GoDaddy Garage. She also co-organizes the Sacramento WordPress Meetup group and WordCamp Sacramento.

How Your Small Business Can Retain More Profits by Avoiding These Common Fees

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How Your Small Business Can Retain More Profits by Avoiding These Common Fees

(Be sure to attend our next workshop at the Buckhead Library on Managing Risk in a Small Business Effectively with Jim Foster
)

It seems as though every time you turn around, there’s a fee. There are fees for starting: activation or setup fees. There are fees for ending: termination fees. If you ever tried to cancel a cell phone plan early or check out of a hotel, you’re charged a fee. While some fees are standard, there are times when we pay them blindly and unnecessarily. Here are ways business owners can avoid some common fees.

Dodge fees when traveling.

It’s easy to get caught off guard when traveling for business. Some hotels charge you a resort fee. This can be for the use of internet, gym facilities, pool or tennis courts whether or not you use them. Avoid minibars, room service and using the telephone at the hotel since those features can come with a hefty markup.

Also, scan each line item on your bill before checking out. Be sure to hold onto your bill too. I once checked out of a hotel in Maryland. I left thinking I was paying the amount that was on my receipt. Shortly after, I noticed a discrepancy for what I was actually charged. Some other random fee was tacked on. Thank goodness for credit card text alerts! I cleared that one up right away by calling the hotel. It was a good reminder to always hang on to the receipt and question any “fees” right away.

Another way to avoid travel-related fees is using the tools already available to you like your credit card for example. Most rewards credit cards offer many travel perks that could cancel out any regular fees and save you money as a result. Forbes Contributor and avid traveler, George Papadopoulos of TravelBloggerBuzz.com explains that the good news is some travel rewards credit cards can enhance your travel experience at the airport. You can gain access to an airline lounge entry, receive early boarding and more. He adds that it saves you money by avoiding baggage fees and other ancillary fees. Just be sure to read the fine print and know what you’re signing up for.

For the rest of this great article please click here. Link ( https://blog.paymently.com/how-your-small-business-can-retain-more-profits-… )

(Be sure to attend our next workshop at the Buckhead Library on Managing Risk in a Small Business Effectively with Jim Foster)

Written by: Karen Cordaway

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Karen is a nationally syndicated personal finance writer and money-saving expert who loves discovering easy solutions to common financial roadblocks. She has written articles for US News Money, Huffington Post, ClarkHoward.com, Due.com and other hot spots on the web. She has been featured in O Magazine, Money Magazine, Market Watch, The Consumerist, MSN, Huffington Post, Yahoo Finance, Daily Finance and many more.

FINANCIAL FOCUS – Use Your Tax Refund Wisely

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FINANCIAL FOCUS

Use Your Tax Refund Wisely

It’s tax time again – which for many Americans means that a tax refund is on its way. If you’re going to get a refund this year, how can you use the money to your best advantage?

Of course, it’s always tempting to spend the check from Uncle Sam on something fun. But a tax refund could be sizable – the average amount in 2016 was $2,857, according to the IRS – so putting this money to work could help boost your progress toward your financial goals.

Here are some possibilities for using your refund:

  • Help fund your IRA. If you were to receive a tax refund of $2,857, you’d have slightly more than half of the $5,500 annual IRA contribution limit for 2017, although, if you are 50 or older, you can contribute an extra $1,000. Consequently, you may find it much easier to fully fund your IRA for the year — and you should do exactly that, because an IRA is a great retirement savings vehicle. If you have a traditional IRA, your contributions may be fully or partially deductible, depending on your income, while your earnings can grow tax deferred. (Taxes are due upon withdrawal, and withdrawals prior to age 59½ may be subject to a 10% IRS penalty.) With a Roth IRA, your contributions are not deductible, but your earnings are distributed tax-free, provided you don’t start taking withdrawals until you’re 59½ and you’ve had your account at least five years.
  • Help diversify your portfolio. If a market downturn hits one asset class, and that’s where you keep most of your money, you could take a big hit. Owning an array of investments – such as stocks, bonds, certificates of deposit, and so on – can help prepare your portfolio to weather the effects of market volatility, By adding new investments, or increasing your holdings of existing investments, you may be able to further diversify your portfolio – and you can use your refund for this purpose. (Keep in mind, though, that diversification, by itself, can’t guarantee profits or protect against loss.)
  • Contribute to a 529 plan. If you have children or grandchildren whom you’d like to help send to college, consider using your tax refund to help fund a 529 plan. Your 529 plan contributions may be deductible from your state taxes, and your earnings are distributed tax-free, provided they are used for qualified higher education expenses. (However, withdrawals not used for higher education expenses may be subject to both income tax and a 10% penalty.)
  • Pay off some debts. You can help improve your financial picture by reducing your debt load – but it may make sense to prioritize these debts. For example, rather than make an extra mortgage payment, you might want to first tackle those debts or loans that carry a high interest rate and that don’t allow you to deduct interest payments. After all, your monthly mortgage payment will remain the same even if you make an extra payment, but if you can get rid of some smaller debts, you will free up some cash that you could use to invest for your future.

Think carefully about how to use your tax refund. It represents an opportunity that you won’t want to waste.

This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Marques Young
Edward Jones Investments
8001 Centerview Parkway, Suite 112
Cordova, TN 38018
Office: (901) 751-0634
Email: marques.young@edwardjones.com
Member SIPC

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How to Decide Which Customer Loyalty Program Is Right for Your Small Business

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Customer loyalty programs used to be extremely expensive for small business owners to operate – they simply couldn’t afford the advanced software, POS systems, and other infrastructure required to run effective loyalty programs.

However, modern technology has changed everything. There are now dozens of companies focusing on providing customer loyalty programs to small businesses, and more are appearing every year. Their costs are quite low, and easy-to-use software makes customer loyalty systems simple to integrate into your small business.

But what’s the best kind of customer loyalty program for your small business? We’ll break down the most basic types of customer rewards and loyalty programs, allowing you to get a better idea of which type may be appropriate for your small business.

Cash Back or Rebate Programs

These programs allow customers to earn a percentage of money back from previous purchases in a set period of time and gives them the opportunity to redeem this money or store credit after a set period of time.

The advantages of such as system are:

  • Simple and easy for customers to understand
  • Gift certificates and store credit drives customers back to your business
  • Customers feel as if they’re “buying in” to your business, making them more likely to return

Some disadvantages include:

  • Lack of “instant gratification”
  • Can be expensive to implement
  • Infrequent shoppers might not be drawn by this program

For the rest of the article, click here

FINANCIAL FOCUS

FINANCIAL FOCUS

What’s Smarter – Paying Off Debts or Investing?

 If you’re just starting out in your career, you will need to be prepared to face some financial challenges along the way – but here’s one that’s not unpleasant: choosing what to do with some extra disposable income. When this happens, what should you do with the money? Your decisions could make a real difference in your ability to achieve your important financial goals.

Under what circumstances might you receive some “found” money? You could get a year-end bonus from your employer, or a sizable tax refund, or even an inheritance. However the money comes to you, don’t let it “slip through your fingers.” Instead, consider these two moves: investing the money or using it to pay off debts.

Which of these choices should you pick? There’s no one “right” answer, as everyone’s situation is different. But here are a few general considerations:

  • Distinguish between “good” and “bad” debt. Not all types of debt are created equal. Your mortgage, for example, is probably a “good” form of debt. You’re using the loan for a valid purpose – i.e., living in your house – and you likely get a hefty tax deduction for the interest you pay. On the other hand, nondeductible consumer debt that carries a high interest rate might be considered “bad” debt – and this is the debt you might want to reduce or eliminate when you receive some extra money. By doing so, you can free up money to save and invest for retirement or other goals.
  • Compare making extra mortgage payments vs. investing. Many of us get some psychological benefits by making extra house payments. Yet, when you do have some extra money, putting it toward your house may not be the best move. For one thing, as mentioned above, your mortgage can be considered a “good” type of debt, so you may not need to rush to pay it off. And from an investment standpoint, your home is somewhat “illiquid” – it’s not always easy to get money out of it. If you put your extra money into traditional investments, such as stocks and bonds, you may increase your growth potential, and you may gain an income stream through interest payments and dividends.
  • Consider tax advantages of investing. Apart from your mortgage, your other debts likely won’t provide you with any tax benefits. But you can get tax advantages by putting money into certain types of investment vehicles, such as a traditional or Roth IRA. When you invest in a traditional IRA, your contributions may be deductible, depending on your income, and your money grows on a tax-deferred basis. (Keep in mind that taxes will be due upon withdrawals, and any withdrawals you make before you reach 59½ may be subject to a 10% IRS penalty.) Roth IRA contributions are not deductible, but your earnings are distributed tax-free, provided you don’t take withdrawals until you reach 59½ and you’ve had your account at least five years.

Clearly, you’ve got some things to ponder when choosing whether to use “extra” money to pay off debts or invest. Of course, it’s not always an “either-or” situation; you may be able to tackle some debts and still invest for the future. In any case, use this money wisely – you weren’t necessarily counting on it, but you can make it count for you.

This article was written by Edward Jones for use by your local Edward Jones Financial Advisor.

Marques Young
Edward Jones Investments
8001 Centerview Parkway, Suite 112
Cordova, TN 38018
Office: (901) 751-0634
Email: marques.young@edwardjones.com
Member SIPC

marques-young

 

Considering a Merchant Cash Advance Loan for Your Business? Think Twice

the_truth_about_merchant_cash_advances_16x9When you’re running a small business, your cash flow can be sporadic early on. It can be hard to come up with money for the things you need while you’re growing and scaling a young business, so it’s normal for many small business owners to take out business loans.

Most legitimate business loans are obtained through traditional banks. However, it can be challenging for newer companies to get approved for such a loan.

In this situation, many small business owners start looking into alternative options. One of the options you’ll come across is something called a “merchant cash advance loan.” This type of loan is offered by private companies that are not banks and are not regulated as a bank.

Before we go into exactly why merchant cash advances don’t work in your favor, we’re going to cut to the chase: it’s kind of like the business loan equivalent to a consumer payday loan. It may be easy to get, but some side effects are high-interest rates, never-ending payments and other factors that could sink your business financially.

It’s a short-term solution with long-term negative implications. Of course, merchant cash advance providers don’t tell you that on their websites and marketing materials. The companies that offer merchant cash advance loans make it sound like it’s a great deal, but as you are learning, it’s not.

How Do Merchant Cash Advance Loans Work?

Merchant cash advances are geared primarily toward businesses where a lot of your income is coming from credit card and debit card sales – think retail shops and restaurants. It’s not technically a loan; it’s a cash advance that you pay back later. You get cash up front, and the merchant cash advance company gets a portion of your future revenue.

Typically there are two ways that a merchant cash advance can be structured. In one model, you get the cash up front and pay it back later with credit card and debit card sales. In the alternate model, you get cash up front, then pay for it with fixed daily or weekly debits from your bank account using Automated Clearing House (ACH) withdrawals.

The ACH model has become increasingly popular in recent years, partly because the companies offering the cash advances can market them to businesses that aren’t reliant on credit card and debit card sales. Under the ACH model, your small business keeps paying daily or weekly payments, plus fees and interest until the merchant cash advance has been paid off in full.

The total fees you’ll pay is determined by your ability to repay the merchant cash advance. The company uses risk assessment to determine this. They assign a factor rate typically ranging from 1.2 to 1.5, with higher rates reflecting increased risk.

To calculate your total repayment amount, you multiply the amount of cash you received by the factor rate. With a factor rate of 1.4, a $75,000 advance will ultimately cost your small business $105,000. That’s $30,000 in extra fees. That’s astronomical.

In the credit card sales model, a percentage of your business sales will go to the merchant cash advance company. The repayment period can be anywhere from three to twelve months. The speed at which you’re able to repay the loan can drive your annual percentage rate (APR) on the cash advance into the triple digits.

Your sales will inevitably fluctuate, and because you’re paying via a percentage of your sales, the time it takes to pay back the loan could be either longer or shorter than you initially expected. Usually, it takes longer.

With the fixed daily or weekly withdrawals model, unlike the credit card sales model, your daily or weekly payment will not go down if your business makes fewer sales and generates less revenue. This payment method can be dangerous if your business isn’t doing as well as you had expected.

For the rest of the article, click here.

3 Steps to Never Running Out of Content Ideas for Your Marketing

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A major part of running a business in the 21st century is online marketing. With a generation of consumers that spends most of their time online, you need to meet them where they are.

The art of online marketing requires that you constantly come out with new content. This includes blogs, social media posts, video, images and just about any piece of content you can post online.

From the technical perspective, it helps Google and new consumers find you. From a less technical but still very important standpoint, consistently putting quality content out there helps you build trust with potential consumers.

The Problem with Content Marketing

I speak with a lot of business owners every week. One of the most common concerns I hear as it pertains to content marketing is the fear of running out of ideas.

It’s a valid concern. Especially if you aren’t accustomed to constantly coming up with new stories, angles or content on a regular basis. The first thing you need to keep in mind is that creativity is a habit that can be learned. The more you practice the better you get at coming up with ideas.

The second thing you need to know is there are steps you can take to make sure you never run out of content ideas for your marketing.

Step 1: Ask your audience what they want.

Want to know the best way to never run out content ideas? Stop trying to come up with them by yourself. Instead, enlist the help of your audience.

What do I mean by this, exactly? It means finding ways to have a constant conversation where your audience informs you about what they need from you. There are multiple ways to do this so that it’s natural and consistent, including:

  • Asking your audience for their input on social media. Here’s an example of what I mean. On January 1st, I posted an image on Instagram with a caption that asked my followers what their money goals were for the new year. Their responses help me come up with future content.
  • Survey your audience on a regular basis. Another thing you can do is send a quick survey out to your audience where you ask them for their input. I did this in the beginning of 2015 when my company was rebranding and it completely changed the course of my marketing. Thanks to this survey, I found out my audience wanted me to create a podcast that answered their business and finance questions. Within a few months, I gave it to them.
  • Interview individuals in your market. Sometimes the best way to get new content ideas is to interview people in your market. As in, have a real life conversation with them and find out what’s going on. What are they dealing with? What are their fears? What questions do they need answers to? How can your business help them solve a problem? Pay close attention to what they tell you and how they say it.
  • Pay attention to customer service queries. If you get a lot of emails or phone calls for your business where people ask you questions, then you can pull some content ideas from it. For example, I often get questions about how to get media mentions so I created a podcast episode explaining how to do it. You can do the same with common questions you receive via social media.
  • Create an email marketing series where you encourage people to reach out to you. There are several email marketing services you can use to automate the emails people receive when they opt in to your At the end of those emails, you can encourage people to reach out to you by asking them a question and telling them they can send you a reply at any time.

The key to asking your audience what they want is to do it consistently. Make it a point to always be having some sort of conversation with them. In doing so, they’ll inform you as to what kind of content they need from you.

This way you don’t even really have to brainstorm. The content ideas are coming straight from the people your business is trying to serve. For the rest of the article click here.

Written by: Amanda Abella

Amanda Abella is a millennial financial expert and Amazon best-selling author of Make Money Your Honey. Through her writing and coaching she teaches millennials how they can have a better relationship with work and money. Her work has been featured in Forbes, The Huffington Post, Business Insider and more. She has also spoken on a national level for The Financial Blogger Conference and Femfessionals.